Brussels sprouts gone wild

Yesterday I food feed our fruit trees. Learnt that young fruit trees and shrubs need to be treated well the first couple of years. I thought about the crab apple tree my sister in Alberta has in her backyard. Many times I picked big, juicy crab apples from a fully grown tree. I decided that I’m going to plant one here on the island. Crab apple trees are great pollinators for apple trees and with 5 apple trees we have on the go, who needs another apple tree. Fellow gardeners have given second looks at me when I talk about crab apple trees. Crab apple trees are not so common here on the island. No room for them here amongst the 450 species of apples! Maybe crab apples are more of a prairie, then island species. All the more reason for me to plant one. Though, I’ll wait until they go on sale in the fall. Best to plant early fall, as well.

Here’s what my garden looks like today, April 28th.

FullSizeRender-9
You may be asking – what is that huge yellow plant? Well, I planted ‘it’ last November and of course, it’s gone wild. I needed to look at my records to figure out what it is! It’s a Brussel sprouts plant. However, I don’t seeing any sprouts forming on the fat stalk. Sheesh! It’s taller than me. I’m leaving it for the yellow flowers and for the bees. The beans have gone wild, as well. Broad beans. Planted them the same time last November. They’re flowering, too. Should be reaching 8 ft soon! At least the dill is growing. There’s also one growing lettuce head on the other side. Tasty lettuce. Lesson learned that cool seasoned veggies are sowed in August. Not November. Coming from the prairies, winter gardening does not mean sowing the seeds in winter. Sheesh! Around and at each side of the veggie plant forest are this year’s cool seasoned veggies – peas, red onion, radishes, lettuce, sweet onion, spinach, artichokes, potatoes – sowed on April 7th, Easter Tuesday.

Well, now it’s raining. When I go out I’ll be wearing my newest addition to gardening. A pair of sloggers. You can’t step into your garden without them.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s